LOGIC MATTERS: You See What You Already Know

http://globalpress.hinduismnow.org/science/scientists-discover-upload-knowledge-brain-telegraph/

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It disturbs science too! See https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/techandscience/scientists-discover-how-to-upload-knowledge-to-your-brain/ar-BBNAlLO

To get right to the point: NO! That is not at ALL what they have done. The headline is like many others: it imposes the writer’s knowledge. Enhanced
by the writer’s desire for it to be true: the headline reflects the desire, not the story.

These ‘scientists’ have managed to simulate neurons in areas of the human brain they have witnessed other human brains use in the same task. (This would be like seeing each time a glass is raised something comes out, so make it easier to raise!) Then when training how to use that task they increase the learning retention by such stimulation. They DO NOT inject memories. They do NOT do hocus pocus with something they don’t have a single clue about. Their very protocol exposes the uselessness of this study and potential.

This is what happens when the current accepted knowledge is just flat wrong. Dr Matthew Phillips is quoted as saying: “When you learn something, your brain physically changes. Connections are made and strengthened in a process called neuro-plasticity.” The problem with that theory is the inductions made from it. ‘Physically changes’. HOW ELSE would it change? No, seriously? Yeah. Instead of focusing on the topic and addressing what that ‘strengthen connection’ thing might actually mean, like all other neuroscience students hone in on the physical change. Just like the glass pouring more each time its raised. Like science watches the sky of the tornado to watch it ‘touch down’, instead of the low pressure at the ground that pulls it down.

Then you wind up with a headline writer who sees cyborgs in his dreams and viola: bullcrap all the way around. The Image above is from the site http://globalpress.hinduismnow.org/science/scientists-discover-upload-knowledge-brain-telegraph/